THE JUDICIARY OF THE REPUBLIC OF SIERRA LEONE.

THE SUPERIOR COURT OF JUDICATURE
THE SUPREME COURT
COURT OF APPEAL
THE HIGH COURT OF JUSTICE
APPOINTMENT OF JUDGES.

 

THE SUPERIOR COURT OF JUDICATURE

120 (1) The Judicial power of Sierra Leone shall be vested in the Judiciary of which the Chief Justice shall be the Head.

(2) The Judiciary shall have jurisdiction in all matters civil and criminal including matters relating to this Constitution, and such other matters in respect of which Parliament may by or under an Act of Parliament confer jurisdiction on the Judiciary.

(3) In the exercise of its judicial functions, the Judiciary shall be subject to only this Constitution or any other law, and shall not be subject to the control or direction of any other person or authority.

(4) The Judicature shall consist of the Supreme Court of Sierra Leone, the Court of Appeal and the High Court of Justice which shall be the superior courts of record of Sierra Leone and which shall constitute on Superior Court of Judicature, and such other inferior and traditional courts as Parliament may by law establish.

(5) The Superior Court of Judicature shall have the power to commit for contempt to themselves and all such powers as were vested in a court of record immediately before the coming into force of this Constitution.

(6) Save as may be otherwise ordered by a Court in the interests of public morality, public safety or public order, all proceedings of every Court, including the announcement of the decision of the court, shall be held in public.

(7) Nothing contained in subsection (6) shall prevent a court from excluding from its proceedings persons, other than the parties thereto and their counsel, to such an extent as the Court may consider necessary or expedient—

  1. in circumstances where publicity would prejudice the interests of justice or any interlocutory proceedings; or
  2. in the interests of defence, public safety, public morality, the welfare of minors or the protection of the private lives of persons concerned in the proceedings.

(8) In the exercise of the Judicial power conferred upon the Judiciary by this Constitution or any other law, the Superior Court of Judicature shall have power, in relation to any matter within its jurisdiction, to issue such orders as may be necessary to monitor credit, ensure the enforcement of any judgement, decree or order of the Court.

(9) A Judge of the Superior Court of Judicature shall not be liable to any action or suit for any matter or thing done by him in the performance of his judicial functions.

(10) The Judges of the High Court shall be entitled to sit as Justices of Appeal, and the Justices of Appeal shall be entitled to sit as Justices of the Supreme Court whenever so requested by the Chief Justice.

(11) Notwithstanding the provisions of the preceding subsections, any Justice of Appeal may, on the request of the Chief Justice, sit and act as a Judge of the High Court.

(12) Every such person, while sitting and acting as a Judge of the High Court, shall have all the jurisdiction, powers and privileges of, but not otherwise be deemed to be, a Judge of the High Court.

(13). The provisions of subsections (11) and (12) shall apply mutatis mutandis to a Justice of the Supreme Court sitting as a Justice of Appeal.

(14) Neither the Chief Justice nor any Justice of the Supreme Court or of the Court of Appeal or a Judge of the High Court may take any part in the hearing of any appeal from his own judgement or the judgement of a panel of judges of which he was a member.

(15) No office of Judge of the High Court, Justice of Appeal or Justice of the Supreme Court shall be abolished while there is a substantive holder thereof.

(16) Every court established under this Constitution shall deliver its decision in writing not later than three months after the conclusion of the evidence and final addresses or arguments of appeal, and furnish all parties to the cause or matter [determined] with duly authenticated copies of the decision on the date of the delivery thereof.

Top credit report site THE SUPREME COURT

121. (1) The Supreme Court shall consist of—

  1. the Chief Justice;
  2. not less than four other Justices of the Supreme Court; and
  3. such other Justices of the Superior Court of Judicature or of Superior Courts in any State practising a body of law similar to Sierra Leone, not being more in number than the number of Justices of the Supreme Court sitting as such, as the Chief Justice may, for the determination of any particular cause or matter by writing under his hand, request to [sit] in the Supreme Court for such period as the Chief Justice may specify or until the request is withdrawn.

(2) The Supreme Court shall, save as otherwise provided in paragraph (a) of subsection (6) of section 28 and section 126 of this Constitution, be duly constituted for the despatch of its business by not less than three Justices thereof.

(3) The Chief Justice shall preside at the sittings of the Supreme Court and in his absence the most senior of the Justices of the Supreme Court as constituted for the time being shall preside. 122. (1) The Supreme Court shall be the final court of appeal in and for Sierra Leone and shall have such appellate and other jurisdiction as may be conferred upon it by this Constitution or any other law;

Provided that notwithstanding any law to the contrary, the President may refer any Petition in which he has to give a final decision to the Supreme Court for a judicial opinion.

(2) The Supreme Court may, while treating its own previous decisions as normally binding, depart from a previous decision when it appears right so to do; and all other Courts shall be bound to follow the decision of the Supreme Court on questions of law.

(3) For the purposes the hearing and determining any matter within its jurisdiction and the amendment, execution or the enforcement of any judgement or order made on any such matter, and for the purposes of any other authority, expressly or by necessary implication given to it, the Supreme Court shall have all the powers, authority and jurisdiction vested in any Court established by this Constitution or any other law. 123. (1) An appeal shall lie from a judgement, decree or order of the Court of Appeal to the Supreme Court—

  1. as of right, in an civil cause or matter;
  2. as of right, in any criminal cause or matter in respect of which an appeal has been brought to the Court of Appeal from a judgement, decree or order of the High Court of Justice i the exercise of its original jurisdiction; or
  3. with leave of the Court of Appeal in any criminal cause or matter, where the Court of Appeal is satisfied that the case involves a substantial question of law or is of public importance.

(2) Notwithstanding the provisions of subsection (1), the Supreme Court shall have power to entertain any application for special leave to appeal in any cause or matter, civil or criminal, to the Supreme Court, and to grant such leave accordingly. 124. (1) The Supreme Court shall, save as otherwise provided in section 122 of this Constitution, have original jurisdiction, to the exclusion of all other Courts—

  1. in all matters relating to the enforcement or interpretation of any provision of this Constitution; and
  2. where any question arises whether an enactment was made in excess of the power conferred upon Parliament or any other authority or person by law or under this Constitution.

(2) Where any question relating to any matter or question as is referred to in subsection (1) arises in any proceedings in any Court, other than the Supreme Court, that Court shall stay the proceedings and refer the question of law involved to the Supreme Court for determination; and the Court in which the question arose shall dispose of the case in accordance with the decision of the Supreme Court.

125. The Supreme Court shall have supervisory jurisdiction over all other Courts in Sierra Leone and over any adjudicating authority; and in exercise of its supervisory jurisdiction shall have power to issue such directions, orders or writs including writs of habeas corpus, orders of certiorari, mandamus and prohibition as it may consider appropriate for the purposes of enforcing or securing the enforcement of its supervisory powers.

126. A single Justice of the Supreme Court acting in its criminal jurisdiction, and three Justices of the Supreme Court acting in its civil jurisdiction may exercise any power vested in the Supreme Court not involving the decision of a cause or matter before the Supreme Court save that—

  1. in criminal matters, if any such Justices refuses or grants an application in the exercise of any such power, any person affected thereby shall be entitled to have the application determined by the Supreme Court constituted by three Justices thereof; and
  2. in civil matters any order, direction or decision made or given by three Justices in pursuance of the powers conferred by this section may be varied, discharged or reversed by the Supreme Court constituted by five Justices thereof.

127. (1) A person who alleges that an enactment or anything contained in or done under the authority of that or any other enactment is inconsistent with, or is in contravention of a provision of this Constitution, may at any time bring an action in the Supreme Court for a declaration to that effect. ie.. flatbed trucking

(2) The Supreme Court shall, for the purposes of a declaration under subsection (1), make such orders and give such directions as it may consider appropriate for giving effect to, or enabling effect to be given to , the declaration so made.

(3) Any person to whom an order or direction is addressed under subsection (1) by the Supreme Court shall duly obey and carry out the terms of the order or direction.

(4) Failure to obey or to carry out the terms of an order or direction made or given under subsection (1) shall constitute a crime under this Constitution.

COURT OF APPEAL

128. (1) The Court of Appeal shall consist of—

  1. The Chief Justice;
  2. not less than seven Justices of the Court of Appeal; and
  3. such other Justices of the Superior Court of Judicature as the Chief Justice may, for the determination of any particular cause or matter by writing under his hand, request to sit in the Court of Appeal for such period as the Chief Justice may specify or until the request is withdrawn.

(2) The Court of Appeal shall be duly constituted by any three Justices thereof and when so constituted the most senior of such Justices shall preside.

(3) Subject to the provisions of subsection (1) and (2) of section 122 of this Constitution, the Court of Appeal shall be bound by its own previous decisions and all Courts inferior to the Court of Appeal shall be bound to follow the decisions of the Court of Appeal on questions of law.

(4) Parliament may create such Divisions of the Court of Appeal as it may consider necessary—

  1. consisting of such number of Justices as may be assigned thereto by the Chief Justice;
  2. sitting at such places in Sierra Leone as the Chief Justice may determine; and
  3. presided over by the most senior of the Justices of the Court of Appeal constituting the Court.
129. (1) The Court of Appeal shall have jurisdiction throughout Sierra Leone to hear and determine, subject to the provisions of this section and of this Constitution, appeals from any judgement, decree or order of the High Court of Justice or any Justice thereof and such other appellate jurisdiction as may be conferred upon it by this Constitution or any other law.

(2) Save as otherwise provided in this Constitution or any other law, an appeal shall lie as of right from a judgement, decree or order of the High Court of Justice to the Court of Appeal in any cause or matter determined by the High Court of Justice.

(3) For the purpose of hearing and determining any appeal within its jurisdiction and the amendment, execution or the enforcement of any judgement or order made on any such appeal and for the purpose of any other authority expressly or by necessary implication given to the Court of Appeal by this Constitution or any other law, the Court of Appeal shall have all the powers, authority and jurisdiction vested in the Court from which the Appeal is brought. 130. A single Justice of the Court of Appeal may exercise any power vested in the Court of Appeal not involving the decision of any cause or matter before the Court of Appeal save that—

  1. in criminal matters, if any such Justice refuses or grants an application in the exercise of any such power, any person affected thereby shall be entitled to have the application determined by the Court of Appeal as duly constituted; and
  2. in civil matters, any order, direction or decision made or given in pursuance of the power conferred by this section may be varied, discharged or reversed by the Court of Appeal as duly constituted.

THE HIGH COURT OF JUSTICE register here

131. (1) The High Court of Justice shall consist of— 

  1. the Chief Justice;
  2. not less than nine High Court Judges; and
  3. such other Judges of the Superior Court of Judicature as the Chief Justice may, for the determination of any particular cause or matter, by writing under his hand request to sit in the High Court of Justice for such period as the Chief Justice may specify or until the request is withdrawn.

(2) The High Court of Justice shall be duly constituted as the case may be— 

  1. by any one Judge thereof; or
  2. by any one Judge thereof and a jury.

(3) There shall be in the said High Court such Divisions consisting of such number of Judges respectively as may be assigned thereto by the Chief Justice; and sitting in such places in Sierra Leone as the Chief Justice may determine. 132. (1) The High Court of Justice shall have jurisdiction in civil and criminal matters and such other original appellate and other jurisdiction as may be conferred upon it by this Constitution or any other law.

(2) The High Court of Justice shall have jurisdiction to determine any matter relating to industrial and labour disputes and administrative complaints.

(3) Parliament shall, by an Act of Parliament, make provision for the exercise of the jurisdiction conferred on the High Court of Justice by the provisions of the immediately preceding subsection.

(4) For the purposes of hearing and determining an appeal within its jurisdiction and the amendment, execution or the enforcement of any judgement or order made on any such appeal, and for the purposes of any other authority expressly or by necessary implication given to the High Court of Justice by this Constitution or any other law, the High Court of Justice shall have all the powers, authority and jurisdiction vested in the Court from which the appeal is brought.

(5) Any Judge of the High Court of Justice may, in accordance with the Rules of Court made in that behalf, exercise in Court or in Chambers all or any part of the jurisdiction vested in the High Court of Justice by this Constitution or any other law. 133. (1) Where a person has a claim against the Government, that claim may be enforced as of right by proceedings taken against the Government for that purpose, without the grant of a fiat or the use of the process known as Petition of Right.

(2) Parliament shall, by an Act of Parliament, make provision for the exercise of jurisdiction under this section.

134. The High Court of Justice shall have supervisory jurisdiction over all inferior and traditional Courts in Sierra Leone and any adjudicating authority, and in the exercise of its supervisory jurisdiction shall have power to issue such directions, writs and orders, including writs of habeas corpus, and orders of certiorari, mandamus and prohibition as it may consider appropriate for the purposes of enforcing or securing the enforcement of its supervisory powers.

APPOINTMENT OF JUDGES.

135. (1) The President shall, acting on the advice of the Judicial and Legal Service Commission and subject to the approval of Parliament, appoint the Chief Justice by warrant under his hand from among persons qualified to hold office as Justice of the Supreme Court.

(2) The other Judges of the Superior Court of Judicature shall be appointed by the President by warrant under his hand acting on the advice of the Judicial and Legal Service Commission and subject to the approval of Parliament.

(3) A person shall not be qualified for appointment as a Judge of the Superior Court of Judicature, unless he is entitled to practise as Counsel in a Court having unlimited jurisdiction in civil and criminal matters in Sierra Leone or any other country having a system of law analogous to that of Sierra Leone and approved by the Judicial and Legal Service Commission, and has been entitled as such Counsel in the case of appointment to— 

  1. the Supreme Court, for not less than twenty years;
  2. the Court of Appeal, for not less than fifteen years;
  3. the High Court of Justice, for not less than ten years.

(4) For the purposes of subsection (3), a person shall be regarded as entitled to practise as Counsel if he has been called, enrolled or otherwise admitted as such and has not subsequently been disbarred or removed from the Roll of Counsel of Legal Practitioners.

(5) For the purposes of this section, a person shall not be regarded as not being entitled to practise in a court by reason only that he is precluded from doing so by virtue of his holding or acting in any office. 136. (1) Where the office of the Chief Justice is vacant or if the Chief Justice is for any reason unable to perform the functions of his office, then— 

  1. until a person has been appointed to and has assumed the functions of that office; or
  2. until the person holding that office has resumed the functions of that office, as the case may be, those functions shall be performed by the most senior for the time being of the Justices of the Supreme Court.

(2) Where the office of a Judge of the High Court is vacant or for any reason a Judge thereof is unable to perform the functions of his office or if the Chief Justice advises the President that the state or business in the High Court of Justice so requires, the President may, acting in accordance with the advice of the Judicial and Legal Service Commission, appoint a person who has held office as, or a person qualified for appointment as, a Judge of the Superior Court of Judicature to act as a Judge of the High Court of Justice, notwithstanding the fact that he has already attained the retiring age prescribed by section 137.

(3) Any person appointed under the provisions of subsection (2) of this section to act as a Judge of the High Court of Justice shall continue to act for the period of his appointment or if no such period is specified until his appointment is revoked by the President, acting in accordance with the advice of the Judicial and Legal Service Commission.

(4) Where the office of a Justice of the Supreme Court or of the Court of Appeal is vacant or for any reason a Justice thereof is unable to perform the functions of his officer or if the Chief Justice advises the President that the state of business in the Supreme Court or in the Court of Appeal, as the case may be, so requires the President may, acting in accordance with advice of the Judicial and Legal Services Commission, appoint a person who has held office as or a person qualified for appointment as a Judge of the Superior Court of Judicature to act as a Justice of the Supreme Court or of the Court of Appeal, as the case may be, notwithstanding the fact that he has already attained the retiring age prescribed by section 137.

(5) Any person appointed under the provisions of subsection (4) of this section to act as a Justice of the Supreme Court or of the Court of Appeal shall continue to act for the period of his appointment or if no such period is specified until his appointment is revoked by the President acting in accordance with the advice of the Judicial and Legal Service Commission.

(6) Notwithstanding the expiration of the period of his appointment, or the revocation of his appointment, a Judge appointed pursuant to the provisions of subsection (2) or (4) of this section, may thereafter continue to act, for a period not exceeding three months, to enable him to deliver judgement or do any other thing in relation to proceedings that were commenced before him previously thereto. 137. (1) Subject to the provisions of this section, a Judge of the Superior Court of Judicature shall hold office during good behaviour.

(2) A person holding office as a Judge of the Superior Court of Judicature—

  1. may retire as a Judge at any time after attaining the age of sixty years;
  2. shall vacate that office on attaining the age of sixty-five years.

(3) Notwithstanding that he has attained the age at which he is required by the provisions of this section to vacate his office, provide secure background checks for a person holding the office of a Judge of the Superior Court of Judicature may continue in office after attaining that age, for a period not exceeding three months, to enable him to deliver judgement or do any other thing in relation to proceedings that were commenced before him previously thereto.

(4) Subject to the provisions of this section, a Judge of the Superior Court of Judicature may be removed from office only for inability to perform the functions of his office, whether arising from infirmity of body or mind or for statement misconduct, and shall not be so removed save in accordance with the provisions of this section

(5) If the Judicial and Legal Service Commission represents to the President that the question of removing a Judge of the Superior Court of Judicature, other than the Chief Justice, under subsection (4) ought to be investigated then— .

  1. the President, acting in consultation with the Judicial and Legal Service Commission, shall appoint a tribunal which shall consist of a Chairman and two other members, all of whom shall be persons qualified to hold or have held office as a Justice of the Supreme Court; and
  2. the tribunal appointed under paragraph (a) shall enquire into the matter and report on the facts thereof and the findings thereon to the President and recommend to the President whether the Judge ought to be removed from office under subsection (7).

(6) Where the question of removing a Judge of the Superior Court of Judicature from office has been referred to a tribunal under subsection (5), the President may suspend the Judge from performing the functions of his office, and any such suspension may at any time be revoked by the President, and shall in any case cease to have effect if the tribunal recommends to the President that the Judge shall not be removed from office.

(7) A Judge of the Superior Court of Judicature shall be removed from office by the President—

  1. if the question of his removal from office has been referred to a tribunal appointed under subsection (5) and the tribunal has recommended to the President that he ought to be removed from office; and
  2. if his removal has been approved by a two-thirds majority in Parliament.

(8) If the President is satisfied on a petition presented to him in that behalf, that the question of removing the Chief Justice ought to be investigated, then—

  1. the President shall, acting in consultation with the Cabinet, appoint a tribunal which shall consist of— 
  1. three Justices of the Supreme Court, or legal practitioners qualified to be appointed as Justices of the Supreme Court; and
  2. two other persons who are not Members of Parliament or legal practitioners;
  1. the tribunal shall enquire into the matter and report on the facts thereof and the findings thereon to the President whether the Chief Justice ought to be removed from office under subsection (10), and the President shall act in accordance with the recommendations of the tribunal.

(9) Where the question of removing the Chief Justice from office has been referred to a tribunal under subsection (8), the President may by warrant under his hand suspend the Chief Justice from performing the functions of his office, and any such suspension may at any time be revoked by the President, and shall in any case cease to have effect if the tribunal recommends to the President that the Chief Justice shall not be removed from office.

(10) The Chief Justice shall be removed from office by the President— 

  1. if the question of his removal from office has been referred to a tribunal appointed under subsection (8) and the tribunal has recommended to the President that he ought to be removed from office; and
  2. if his removal has been approved by a two-thirds majority in Parliament.
137. (1) Subject to the provisions of this section, a Judge of the Superior Court of Judicature shall hold office during good behaviour.

(2) A person holding office as a Judge of the Superior Court of Judicature—

  1. may retire as a Judge at any time after attaining the age of sixty years;
  2. shall vacate that office on attaining the age of sixty-five years.

(3) Notwithstanding that he has attained the age at which he is required by the provisions of this section to vacate his office, a person holding the office of a Judge of the Superior Court of Judicature may continue in office after attaining that age, for a period not exceeding three months, to enable him to deliver judgement or do any other thing in relation to proceedings that were commenced before him previously thereto.

(4) Subject to the provisions of this section, a Judge of the Superior Court of Judicature may be removed from office only for inability to perform the functions of his office, whether arising from infirmity of body or mind or for statement misconduct, and shall not be so removed save in accordance with the provisions of this section

(5) If the Judicial and Legal Service Commission represents to the President that the question of removing a Judge of the Superior Court of Judicature, other than the Chief Justice, under subsection (4) ought to be investigated then— .

  1. the President, acting in consultation with the Judicial and Legal Service Commission, shall appoint a tribunal which shall consist of a Chairman and two other members, all of whom shall be persons qualified to hold or have held office as a Justice of the Supreme Court; and
  2. the tribunal appointed under paragraph (a) shall enquire into the matter and report on the facts thereof and the findings thereon to the President and recommend to the President whether the Judge ought to be removed from office under subsection (7).

(6) Where the question of removing a Judge of the Superior Court of Judicature from office has been referred to a tribunal under subsection (5), the President may suspend the Judge from performing the functions of his office, and any such suspension may at any time be revoked by the President, and shall in any case cease to have effect if the tribunal recommends to the President that the Judge shall not be removed from office.

(7) A Judge of the Superior Court of Judicature shall be removed from office by the President—

  1. if the question of his removal from office has been referred to a tribunal appointed under subsection (5) and the tribunal has recommended to the President that he ought to be removed from office; and
  2. if his removal has been approved by a two-thirds majority in Parliament.

(8) If the President is satisfied on a petition presented to him in that behalf, that the question of removing the Chief Justice ought to be investigated, then—

  1. the President shall, acting in consultation with the Cabinet, appoint a tribunal which shall consist of— 
  1. three Justices of the Supreme Court, or legal practitioners qualified to be appointed as Justices of the Supreme Court; and
  2. two other persons who are not Members of Parliament or legal practitioners;
  1. the tribunal shall enquire into the matter and report on the facts thereof and the findings thereon to the President whether the Chief Justice ought to be removed from office under subsection (10), and the President shall act in accordance with the recommendations of the tribunal.

(9) Where the question of removing the Chief Justice from office has been referred to a tribunal under subsection (8), the President may by warrant under his hand suspend the Chief Justice from performing the functions of his office, and any such suspension may at any time be revoked by the President, and shall in any case cease to have effect if the tribunal recommends to the President that the Chief Justice shall not be removed from office.

(10) The Chief Justice shall be removed from office by the President— 

  1. if the question of his removal from office has been referred to a tribunal appointed under subsection (8) and the tribunal has recommended to the President that he ought to be removed from office; and
  2. if his removal has been approved by a two-thirds majority in Parliament.
137. (1) Subject to the provisions of this section, a Judge of the Superior Court of Judicature shall hold office during good behaviour.

(2) A person holding office as a Judge of the Superior Court of Judicature—

  1. may retire as a Judge at any time after attaining the age of sixty years;
  2. shall vacate that office on attaining the age of sixty-five years.

(3) Notwithstanding that he has attained the age at which he is required by the provisions of this section to vacate his office, a person holding the office of a Judge of the Superior Court of Judicature may continue in office after attaining that age, for a period not exceeding three months, to enable him to deliver judgement or do any other thing in relation to proceedings that were commenced before him previously thereto.

(4) Subject to the provisions of this section, a Judge of the Superior Court of Judicature may be removed from office only for inability to perform the functions of his office, whether arising from infirmity of body or mind or for statement misconduct, and shall not be so removed save in accordance with the provisions of this section

(5) If the Judicial and Legal Service Commission represents to the President that the question of removing a Judge of the Superior Court of Judicature, other than the Chief Justice, under subsection (4) ought to be investigated then— .

  1. the President, acting in consultation with the Judicial and Legal Service Commission, shall appoint a tribunal which shall consist of a Chairman and two other members, all of whom shall be persons qualified to hold or have held office as a Justice of the Supreme Court; and
  2. the tribunal appointed under paragraph (a) shall enquire into the matter and report on the facts thereof and the findings thereon to the President and recommend to the President whether the Judge ought to be removed from office under subsection (7).

(6) Where the question of removing a Judge of the Superior Court of Judicature from office has been referred to a tribunal under subsection (5), the President may suspend the Judge from performing the functions of his office, and any such suspension may at any time be revoked by the President, and shall in any case cease to have effect if the tribunal recommends to the President that the Judge shall not be removed from office.

(7) A Judge of the Superior Court of Judicature shall be removed from office by the President—

  1. if the question of his removal from office has been referred to a tribunal appointed under subsection (5) and the tribunal has recommended to the President that he ought to be removed from office; and
  2. if his removal has been approved by a two-thirds majority in Parliament.

(8) If the President is satisfied on a petition presented to him in that behalf, that the question of removing the Chief Justice ought to be investigated, then—

  1. the President shall, acting in consultation with the Cabinet, appoint a tribunal which shall consist of— 
  1. three Justices of the Supreme Court, or legal practitioners qualified to be appointed as Justices of the Supreme Court; and
  2. two other persons who are not Members of Parliament or legal practitioners;
  1. the tribunal shall enquire into the matter and report on the facts thereof and the findings thereon to the President whether the Chief Justice ought to be removed from office under subsection (10), and the President shall act in accordance with the recommendations of the tribunal.

(9) Where the question of removing the Chief Justice from office has been referred to a tribunal under subsection (8), the President may by warrant under his hand suspend the Chief Justice from performing the functions of his office, and any such suspension may at any time be revoked by the President, and shall in any case cease to have effect if the tribunal recommends to the President that the Chief Justice shall not be removed from office.

(10) The Chief Justice shall be removed from office by the President— 

  1. if the question of his removal from office has been referred to a tribunal appointed under subsection (8) and the tribunal has recommended to the President that he ought to be removed from office; and
  2. if his removal has been approved by a two-thirds majority in Parliament.
137. (1) Subject to the provisions of this section, a Judge of the Superior Court of Judicature shall hold office during good behaviour.

(2) A person holding office as a Judge of the Superior Court of Judicature—

  1. may retire as a Judge at any time after attaining the age of sixty years;
  2. shall vacate that office on attaining the age of sixty-five years.

(3) Notwithstanding that he has attained the age at which he is required by the provisions of this section to vacate his office, a person holding the office of a Judge of the Superior Court of Judicature may continue in office after attaining that age, for a period not exceeding three months, to enable him to deliver judgement or do any other thing in relation to proceedings that were commenced before him previously thereto.

(4) Subject to the provisions of this section, a Judge of the Superior Court of Judicature may be removed from office only for inability to perform the functions of his office, whether arising from infirmity of body or mind or for statement misconduct, and shall not be so removed save in accordance with the provisions of this section

(5) If the Judicial and Legal Service Commission represents to the President that the question of removing a Judge of the Superior Court of Judicature, other than the Chief Justice, under subsection (4) ought to be investigated then— .

  1. the President, acting in consultation with the Judicial and Legal Service Commission, shall appoint a tribunal which shall consist of a Chairman and two other members, all of whom shall be persons qualified to hold or have held office as a Justice of the Supreme Court; and
  2. the tribunal appointed under paragraph (a) shall enquire into the matter and report on the facts thereof and the findings thereon to the President and recommend to the President whether the Judge ought to be removed from office under subsection (7).

(6) Where the question of removing a Judge of the Superior Court of Judicature from office has been referred to a tribunal under subsection (5), the President may suspend the Judge from performing the functions of his office, and any such suspension may at any time be revoked by the President, and shall in any case cease to have effect if the tribunal recommends to the President that the Judge shall not be removed from office.

(7) A Judge of the Superior Court of Judicature shall be removed from office by the President—

  1. if the question of his removal from office has been referred to a tribunal appointed under subsection (5) and the tribunal has recommended to the President that he ought to be removed from office; and
  2. if his removal has been approved by a two-thirds majority in Parliament.

(8) If the President is satisfied on a petition presented to him in that behalf, a one time score that the question of removing the Chief Justice ought to be investigated, then—

  1. the President shall, acting in consultation with the Cabinet, appoint a tribunal which shall consist of— 
  1. three Justices of the Supreme Court, or legal practitioners qualified to be appointed as Justices of the Supreme Court; and
  2. two other persons who are not Members of Parliament or legal practitioners;
  1. the tribunal shall enquire into the matter and report on the facts thereof and the findings thereon to the President whether the Chief Justice ought to be removed from office under subsection (10), and the President shall act in accordance with the recommendations of the tribunal.

(9) Where the question of removing the Chief Justice from office has been referred to a tribunal under subsection (8), the President may by warrant under his hand suspend the Chief Justice from performing the functions of his office, and any such suspension may at any time be revoked by the President, and shall in any case cease to have effect if the tribunal recommends to the President that the Chief Justice shall not be removed from office.

(10) The Chief Justice shall be removed from office by the President— 

  1. if the question of his removal from office has been referred to a tribunal appointed under subsection (8) and the tribunal has recommended to the President that he ought to be removed from office; and
  2. if his removal has been approved by a two-thirds majority in Parliament.

138. (1) The salaries, allowances, gratuities and pensions of Judges of the Superior Court of Judicature shall be a charge upon the Consolidated Fund.

(2) A Judge of the Superior Court of Judicature shall on retiring from office as such Judge, be entitled to gratuity and pension as may be determined by Parliament.

(3) The salary, allowances, privileges, right in respect of leave of absence, gratuity or pension and other conditions of service of a Judge of the Superior Court of Judicature shall not be varied to his disadvantage.

(4) A Judge of the Superior Court of Judicature shall not while he continues in office, hold any other office of profit or emolument, whether by way of allowances or otherwise, whether private or public, and either directly or indirectly. 139. A Judge of the Superior court shall, before assuming the functions of his office, take and subscribe before—

  1. the President, in the case of the Chief Justice and Justices of the Supreme Court; and
  2. the Chief Justice, in the case of any other Judge,

 the Judicial Oath as set out in the Third Schedule to this Constitution. 140. (1) There shall be established a Judicial and Legal Service Commission which shall advise the Chief Justice in the performance of his administrative functions and perform such other functions as provided by this Constitution or by any other law, and which shall consist of—

  1. the Chief Justice, who shall be the Chairman;
  2. the most Senior Justice of the Court of Appeal;
  3. the Solicitor-General;
  4. one practicing Counsel of not less than ten years standing nominated by the Sierra Leone Bar Association and appointed by the President;
  5. the Chairman of the Public Service Commission; and
  6. two other persons, not being legal practitioners, to be appointed by the President, subject to the approval of Parliament.

(2) The Chief Justice shall, acting in accordance with the advice of the Judicial and Legal Service Commission and save as otherwise provided in this Constitution, be responsible for the effective and efficient administration of the Judiciary.

(3) The following provisions shall apply in relation to a member of the Judicial and Legal Service Commission who is appointed pursuant to paragraphs (d) and (f) of subsection (1)—

  1. subject to the provisions of this subsection, such member shall vacate office at the expiration of three years from the date of his appointment;
  2. any such member may be removed from office by the President for inability to discharge the functions of his office (whether arising from infirmity of mind or body or any other cause) or misconduct; and
  3. such member shall not be removed from office except in accordance with the provisions of this subsection.

(4) A member of the Judicial and Legal Service Commission shall, before assuming the functions of his office, take and subscribe before the President the oath as set out in the Third Schedule to this Constitution. 141. (1) The power to appoint persons to hold or act in an office to which this section applies (including the power to make appointments on promotion and transfer from one office to another and to confirm appointments) and to dismiss and exercise disciplinary control over persons holding or acting in such offices shall vest in the Judicial and Legal Service Commission;

Provided that the Commission may, with the approval of the President and subject to such conditions as it may think fit, delegate any of its powers under this section, by direction in writing, to any of its members, or to any Judge of the High Court, or to the holder of any office to which this section applies, or, in the case of a power relating to an office connected with the Court of Appeal or the Supreme Court, to any Justice of either of those Courts.

(2) This section applies to the offices of Administrator and Registrar-General, Registrar and Deputy Registrar of the Supreme Court, Registrar and Deputy Registrar of the Court of Appeal, Master and Registrar of the High Court, Deputy Master and Registrar of the High Court, any Registrar of the High Court, Deputy Administrator and Registrar-General, any Principal Magistrate, Senior Magistrate, Magistrate, Under Sheriff, First Parliamentary Counsel, Second Parliamentary Counsel, Principal State Counsel, Customary Law Officer, Senior State Counsel, Senior Parliamentary Counsel, Research Counsel, Parliamentary Counsel, State Counsel, Assistant Customary Law Officer and such other officers as may be prescribed by Parliament. 142. (1) The appointment of officers and servants of the Courts of Sierra Leone shall, subject to the provisions of section 141 of this Constitution, be made by the Chief Justice or such other Judge or officer of the Court as the Chief Justice may direct, acting in consultation with the Judicial and Legal Service Commission.

(2) The Judicial and Legal Service Commission may, acting in consultation with the Public Service Commission and with the prior approval of the President, make regulations by statutory instrument prescribing the terms and conditions of service of officers and other employees of the Courts and of the Judicial and the Legal Services established by this Constitution or any other law.

143. Any fees, fines or other moneys taken by the Courts shall form part of the Consolidated Fund.

144. (1) Whenever in any proceedings in a Court, other than the Supreme Court, any question arises as to the discovery of an official document, and any person or authority having custody legal or otherwise of any such document refuses, upon request, to produce that document, on the ground—

  1. that the document belongs to a class of documents which it is prejudicial to the security of the State or injurious to the public interest to produce, or
  2. that the disclosure of the contents thereof will be prejudicial to the security of the State or injurious to the public interest,

the Court shall stay the proceedings and refer the question to the Supreme Court for determination.

(2) The Supreme Court may, pursuant to the provision of subsection (1)—

  1. order any person or authority having custody, legal or otherwise, of the document to produce it; and any person so ordered shall produce the document for the purpose of inspection by the Supreme Court; and
  2. determine whether or not any such document shall be produced in the Court from which the reference was made after hearing the parties thereto or their legal representatives or after heaving given them the opportunity of being heard.

(3) Where the Supreme Court is of the opinion that the document shall be produced, it shall make an order upon the person or authority having custody of the document to produce the same or so much of the contents thereof as is essential for the proceedings in accordance with the terms of the order.

(4) Where the question of the discovery of an official document arises in any proceedings in the Supreme Court in the circumstances mentioned in subsection (1) of this section, the Supreme Court shall be governed, mutatis mutandis, by the preceding provisions of this section for the determination of the question that has arisen. 145. (1) There shall be established a Rules of Court Committee which shall consist of—

  1. the Chief Justice, who shall be Chairman;
  2. the Director of Public Prosecutions;
  3. a Justice of the Supreme Court, a Justice of Appeal, and a Judge of the High Court, to be appointed by the Chief Justice;
  4. the First Parliamentary Counsel;
  5. a nominee of the Attorney-General and Minister of Justice;
  6. two practicing Counsel of not less than ten years standing both of whom shall be nominated annually by the Sierra Leone Bar Association.

(2) Subject to the provisions of this Constitution the Rules of Court Committee may make Rules of Court for regulating the practice and procedures of all Courts in Sierra Leone, which shall include rules relating to the prevention of frivolous and vexatious proceedings.